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How do you select the works and authors listed?
What do the bracketed letters mean next to some of the work titles?
What do the graphic symbols in the index mean?
What do the abbreviations in the Reading Lists index stand for?
Why don't you list in the language index all the languages you have works linked in?


How do you select the works and authors listed?
The core works and authors listed on this site were taken from some of the reading lists which are indexed on the site -- the Great Books Foundation adult reading program, the reading list in the back of How To Read A Book (Mortimer Adler's classic text on intelligent reading), the Great Books of the Western World collection, and the Great Ideas program. I am also planning on checking my site against the Harvard Classics series.

Beyond that, some works were added because of their reputation, some because of a personal feeling that they should be included, and others because they were suggested by visitors to the site.

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What do the bracketed letters mean next to some of the work titles?
These are "inclusion codes" which indicate the source or reason for inclusion of that work. As an example, let's look at the header of the listing for Freud's Civilization and its Discontents:
Civilization and its Discontents [GBF,GBWW,HTR]

The [GBF,GBWW,HTR] at the end are the inclusion codes. The following codes are used:

  1. HTR / htr
    Stands for How To Read a Book, Mortimer Adler's classic on intelligent reading. Works with the code HTR are included specifically in the list in the back of this book; works with the code htr are included because a generic reference was made to all of the author's works, or all works of a given type (such as plays, poems, etc).

  2. GBWW
    Stands for Great Books of the Western World, the famous collection published by Encyclopaedia Britannica. Works with this code are included, in whole or in part, in this collection. I have not yet added listings for works in the expanded GBWW collection (volumes 55-60).

  3. GBF / GBF(50) / gbf(HS) / etc.
    Stands for the Great Books Foundation, an organization devoted to promoting the discussion of the Great Books by people from all walks of life. Works with this code are included, in whole or in part, in one of the Foundation's reading lists; GBF indicates a work included in the Adult Reading and Discussion Program; gbf indicates a work included in one of their various other reading and discussion programs, but not in the adult program. If the work is included in one or both of the other programs, they will be noted in parentheses - (50) for the 50th Anniversary reading program, (HS) for the High School reading program

  4. GI
    Stands for the Great Ideas Program. Works with this code are mentioned, in whole or in part, in this collection.

  5. HC
    Stands for Harvard Classics, Harvard University's collection of classic works. Works with this code are included, in whole or in part, in this collection. I have not finished listing these works yet.

Please note that this site is constantly under construction - not all works will be coded, or coded completely. So, a work might be included in all of the collections/books/lists above, but only have one code, or none. If you note a discrepancy, please let me know.

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What do the graphic symbols in the index mean?
The symbols indicate the availability of the work through this site.

  On-line version linked.
  Only incomplete on-line versions available, and none from Amazon.com
  Only incomplete on-line versions available, but can buy through Amazon.com
  No on-line version linked, but can buy through Amazon.com
  No links to on-line version or to Amazon.com
  No links to on-line version or to Amazon.com under that name; work may be known under another name for which on-line and/or Amazon.com links exist.
For an author, the symbol refers to any work. So, an author with five listed works will be marked if any one of his or her works has an etext linked.

Again, these only refer to the availability of the work through this site. If you know of an online version of a work which we have few or no etexts linked for, please let me know about it. Also, if you note any discrepancies between the symbols in an index and the actual listing of the work, please let me know.
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What do the abbreviations in the Reading Lists index stand for?
  • "Core" - The Core Reading List is of my own design. Any work which appears in three of these four sets of reading lists is included: Great Books Foundation (includes GBF, GBF-50, and GBF-HS); Britannica (includes GBWW and Great Ideas); How to Read a Book (HTR); and Harvard Classics (HC).
  • "Major" - All works included in any of the four major reading lists, namely the Great Books Foundation Adult Reading Series (GBF), Britannica's Great Books of the Western World (GBWW), How to Read a Book (HTR), and the Harvard Classics (HC).
  • "GBF" - The Great Books Foundation's adult reading and discussion list.
  • "GBF-50" - The Great Books Foundation's 50th Anniversary adult reading and discussion list.
  • "GBF-HS" - The Great Books Foundation's high school reading and discussion list.
  • "GBWW" - The contents of Britannica's Great Books of the Western World collection.
  • "Great Ideas" - The contents of the 10-volume set of the Great Ideas Program (a supplement to Great Books of the Western World).
  • "HC" - The contents of the Harvard Classics.
  • "HTR" - The list from the appendix of Mortimer Adler's classic text on intelligent reading, How to Read a Book.
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Why don't you list in the language index all the languages you have works linked in?
As a rule, I only list a language in the index if I have works from at least two different authors available in that language.

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[A-Ap]  [Ar-B]  [C-Cl]  [Co-Cy]  [D]  [E-Eu]  [Ev-F]  [G]  [H]  [I]  [J-K]  [L]  [M-Me]  [Mi-N]  [O]  [P-Po]  [Pr-Py]  [Q-R]  [S-Sn]  [So-Sy]  [T-To]  [Tr-V]  [W-Z] 
Naturalia, Parva
Pantagruel, Gargantua and
Papers, Pickwick
Papers on Hysteria, Selected
Parabola, On the Quadrature of the
Paradise Lost
Paradise Regained
Paradiso
Paris, Notre Dame de
Parma, The Charterhouse of
Parmenides
Parts of Animals, On the
Parva Naturalia
Passage, Rites of
Passionate Pilgrim, The
Past, Remembrance of Things
Pauper, The Prince and the
Peace (Aristophanes)
Peace, Perpetual
Peace, War and
Pearl, The
Peer Gynt
Peloponnesian War, History of the
Pendulum, The Pit and the
Pensees
Pepys, Samuel
Pere Goriot
Perfection, The Way of
Pericles, Prince of Tyre
Perpetual Peace
Perplexed, Guide of the
Persian Letters
Persian War, History of the
Persians, The
Persons and Places
Persuasion
Pessimism, Studies in
Phaedo (Plato)
Phaedra (Racine)
Phaedrus (Plato)
Phenomenology of Mind
Philebus
Philoctetes
Philosophical Dictionary
Philosophical Manuscripts, Economic and
Philosophical Mistakes; Ten
Philosophy, Introduction to Mathematical
Philosophy, Mathematical Principles of Natural
Philosophy, Meditations on First
Philosophy, The Positive
Philosophy, The Problems of
Philosophy of History, Lectures on the
Philosophy of Money
Philosophy of Right
Phoenician Women, The
Phoenix and the Turtle, The
Physics
Physics, The Evolution of
Physics, On the Method of Theoretical
Pickwick Papers
Picture of Dorian Gray, The
Pilgrim, The Passionate
Pilgrim's Progress
Pimpernel, The Scarlet
Pit and the Pendulum, The
Places; On Airs, Waters, and
Places, Persons and
Plague, The
Planes, On the Equilibrium of
Plays of William Shakespeare, The (Johnson)
Pleasure Principle, Beyond the
Plutus
Poems (Blake)
Poems (E. Brontë)
Poems (E.B. Browning)
Poems (Byron)
Poems (Coleridge)
Poems (Dickinson)
Poems (Donne)
Poems (T.S. Eliot)
Poems (Emerson)
Poems (Frost)
Poems (Johnson)
Poems (Keats)
Poems (Milton)
Poems (Poe)
Poems (Pope)
Poems (Scott)
Poems (Shelley)
Poems (Tennyson)
Poems (Wordsworth)
Poems (Yeats)
Poesy or Art, On
Poet, A Letter of Advice to a Young
Poetic Principle, The
Poetica, Ars
Poetics
Poetry, The Art of
Poetry, A Defence of
Poetry and Truth
Poets, The Lives of the
Political, Essays Moral and
Political Economy, On
Politics
Politics and the English Language
Polity, The Laws of Ecclesiastical
Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, A
Portrait of a Lady
Portuguese, Sonnets from the
Positive Philosophy, The
Possessed, The
Posterior Analytics
Power; On Evil, Guilt, and
Power, The Will to
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